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Check out @TheAtlantic’s Tweet:

Love demands everything, they say, but my love demands only this: that no matter what happens or how long it takes, you’ll keep faith in me, you’ll remember who we are, and you’ll never feel despair.
Ann Brashares, My Name Is Memory  (via bookmania)
The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn.
Alvin Toffler, Future Shock (via bookmania)
siggly:

#quote #morganfreeman #gay #homo #gaypride #lesbian #lesbians #LGBT #pride #fuckthehaters #hatersgonnahate

I agree with Morgan Freeman.

siggly:

#quote #morganfreeman #gay #homo #gaypride #lesbian #lesbians #LGBT #pride #fuckthehaters #hatersgonnahate

I agree with Morgan Freeman.

bookmania:

I’m in love with a postcard book called Everything Is Connected: Reimagining the World One Postcard at a Time by Keri Smith

An interesting project

theatlantic:

These Journalists Spent Two Years and $750,000 Covering One Story

In recent weeks, ProPublica has published a major—and scathing—investigative series on the dangers of Tylenol’s main active ingredient, acetaminophen. Two years in the making, this series shows yet again the essential role of investigative journalism in providing public information that can literally save lives. 
On the chance that the impact of the revelations has already been overtaken by other news, here again is the gist of the stories. Tylenol’s marketing has long emphasized its safety. Among the more memorable of its advertisements was that Tylenol was the pain reliever “hospitals use most” and packages asserted that the pills provided “safe, fast pain relief.” It turns out that these claims were dangerously misleading, and were known to be so by both the pharmaceutical manufacturer and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. To expand the reach of its findings to millions of radio listeners, ProPublica, brought in public radio’s This American Life as a collaborator which incisively summarized ProPublica’s evidence of the dangers of acetaminophen. “During the last decade,” the first ProPublica piece begins, “more than 1,500 Americans died after taking too much of a drug renowned for its safety.” Moreover, the series and broadcast showed that the FDA has known for decades about the scale of the problem, but has failed to fully implement a succession of recommendations and warnings.
Read more. [Image: ProPublica/Flickr]

theatlantic:

These Journalists Spent Two Years and $750,000 Covering One Story

In recent weeks, ProPublica has published a major—and scathing—investigative series on the dangers of Tylenol’s main active ingredient, acetaminophen. Two years in the making, this series shows yet again the essential role of investigative journalism in providing public information that can literally save lives. 

On the chance that the impact of the revelations has already been overtaken by other news, here again is the gist of the stories. Tylenol’s marketing has long emphasized its safety. Among the more memorable of its advertisements was that Tylenol was the pain reliever “hospitals use most” and packages asserted that the pills provided “safe, fast pain relief.” It turns out that these claims were dangerously misleading, and were known to be so by both the pharmaceutical manufacturer and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. To expand the reach of its findings to millions of radio listeners, ProPublica, brought in public radio’s This American Life as a collaborator which incisively summarized ProPublica’s evidence of the dangers of acetaminophen. “During the last decade,” the first ProPublica piece begins, “more than 1,500 Americans died after taking too much of a drug renowned for its safety.” Moreover, the series and broadcast showed that the FDA has known for decades about the scale of the problem, but has failed to fully implement a succession of recommendations and warnings.

Read more. [Image: ProPublica/Flickr]

theatlantic:

A Brief Tour of the Digital Delights of the Folger Shakespeare Library

How do you make a library live online?
Read more. [Image courtesy of the Folger Shakespeare Library]

theatlantic:

A Brief Tour of the Digital Delights of the Folger Shakespeare Library

How do you make a library live online?

Read more. [Image courtesy of the Folger Shakespeare Library]